"This tension between restriction and desire is also evident in the work of Helmut Lang who proposes a different relation between image and setting. Hailing from Vienna, home of the waltz and sugar-coated romanticism Lang creates clothes in contradiction to this aesthetic. His pared, spartan designs possess the utilitarian qualities of street clothes but couched in luxurious, tactile materials, which feminise and soften them. His clothes designs are very much in keeping with the writings of Adolf Loos, the Viennese architect who began the modernist assault on ornamentation. Loos believed the ideal condition of clothing for modern man was as an unreadable surface, a mask of concealment rather than character that would offset a cultivated interior. Helmut Lang’s collaboration with American artist Jenny Holzer for the 1996 Venice Biennale took the form of a projected slogan that read I SMELL YOU ON MY CLOTHES implying that interior desires rest on the surface, as if worn on the body. The webpage for Lang’s perfume range scrolls down similarly distinctive phrases: I WALK IN — I SEE YOU — I WATCH YOU — I SCAN YOU — I WAIT FOR YOU — I TEASE YOU — I BREATHE YOU — I SMELL YOU ON MY SKIN. Not only does it attempt to describe the indescribable, it performs the experience of wearing it."

Alistair O’Neill, “Imagining Fashion: Helmut Lang & Maison Martin Margiela” (via organization)


audrey marnay at ann demeuelemeester f/w 1998

audrey marnay at ann demeuelemeester f/w 1998

(Source: fitdesignerfiles, via track1-5)

(Source: tracksoot, via krisvanschiele)

organization:

Rick OwensDressing the Home: The Private Spaces of Top Fashion Designers, 2008by Marie Bariller, photography by Guillaume de LaubierQ: If you were an item of furniture, what would you be?A: A concrete bench.

organization:

Rick Owens
Dressing the Home: The Private Spaces of Top Fashion Designers
, 2008
by Marie Bariller, photography by Guillaume de Laubier

Q: If you were an item of furniture, what would you be?
A: A concrete bench.

(via shopacnestudios)

Patti Smith and Ann Demeulemeester

"Ann Demeulemeester was sixteen years old when she first encountered Smith. On a whim, she bought a copy of Smith’s record Horses. There was something about the cover sleeve a woman staring unflinchingly into the camera, her pale face framed with jet-black hair, her aquiline nose punctuated by the stern horizontal of her mouth that made the young Demeulemeester stop and stare. With a jacket slung over her shoulder, a tie around her neck and the slightest trace of facial fair above her upper lip, Patti Smith whoever she was had a compelling ambiguity about her. Upon listening to the androgynous American’s defiant three-chord songs Demeulemeester was even more inspired. So when it came to selecting a soundtrack for her Paris runway debut in 1991 more than a decade later, Smith’s ragged poetry was an obvious choice. Demeulemeester played the album Wave and as a gesture of thanks, sent Smith a package containing a note and a white shirt from the collection. The shirt struck a chord with Smith she felt it had been made for her and she wrote back straight away. The correspondence would last five years before the pair finally met backstage at a gig of Smith’s in Ostend."

Patti Smith and Ann Demeulemeester

"Ann Demeulemeester was sixteen years old when she first encountered Smith. On a whim, she bought a copy of Smith’s record Horses. There was something about the cover sleeve a woman staring unflinchingly into the camera, her pale face framed with jet-black hair, her aquiline nose punctuated by the stern horizontal of her mouth that made the young Demeulemeester stop and stare. With a jacket slung over her shoulder, a tie around her neck and the slightest trace of facial fair above her upper lip, Patti Smith whoever she was had a compelling ambiguity about her. Upon listening to the androgynous American’s defiant three-chord songs Demeulemeester was even more inspired. So when it came to selecting a soundtrack for her Paris runway debut in 1991 more than a decade later, Smith’s ragged poetry was an obvious choice. Demeulemeester played the album Wave and as a gesture of thanks, sent Smith a package containing a note and a white shirt from the collection. The shirt struck a chord with Smith she felt it had been made for her and she wrote back straight away. The correspondence would last five years before the pair finally met backstage at a gig of Smith’s in Ostend."

(Source: oystermag.com)

iaintnobodyswhore:

Patti Smith holding a gun
Chelsea Hotel, 1970

iaintnobodyswhore:

Patti Smith holding a gun

Chelsea Hotel, 1970

thedoppelganger:

So Wot Is Wat?Magazine: Dazed and Confused October 1998 
Kate Moss photographed by Liz Collins 

thedoppelganger:

So Wot Is Wat?
Magazine: Dazed and Confused October 1998 

Kate Moss photographed by Liz Collins 

cotonblanc:

martin margielathat evening, i go through a list of margielas in the belgian phone directory hoping that someone can bring a reality to the designer. there are about a dozen of them and i pick a number at random. someone answers almost immediately. “yes hello i’m writing a piece on martin margiela… ” i say. “he’s my brother,” interrupts a gentle, male voice on the other end. “but i don’t speak about him.” it is an abrupt call, but it confirms that martin margiela is real. he’s not a ghost.

cotonblanc:

martin margiela

that evening, i go through a list of margielas in the belgian phone directory hoping that someone can bring a reality to the designer. there are about a dozen of them and i pick a number at random. someone answers almost immediately. “yes hello i’m writing a piece on martin margiela… ” i say. “he’s my brother,” interrupts a gentle, male voice on the other end. “but i don’t speak about him.” it is an abrupt call, but it confirms that martin margiela is real. he’s not a ghost.


Amica, May 2014

Amica, May 2014

(Source: opaqueglitter, via highonflowers)

"I don’t like buying something that I’ll throw out in three months because it’s of poor quality or off trend. I don’t think you have to change your wardrobe every six months. You build your wardrobe. Elegance is what I’m after, and it’s the quality of the fabric, the cut, the details, the color. That’s my job. At the end of the day, it’s not the clothes that make style; it’s the person himself. I like the essential dimension of fashion. That’s what I think I’m best at. Helping each and every person find his own uniform."

Christophe Lemaire

Christophe Lemaire: Paris fashion’s ace of clubs
By Rebecca Voight
Tomorrow morning in an old locksmith’s atelier in Paris’ once industrial 11th arrondissement, Christophe Lemaire will hold a show for his eponymous brand. It is his first in a long time. For the past two years, Lemaire has been the women’s designer for Hermès. Before that, he made the crocodile look chic in mens- and womenswear for Lacoste. Lemaire’s love affair with fashion began when he served as an intern for Yves Saint Laurent back in 1985. Or maybe it started earlier, inspired by his mother and grandmother who wore YSL or by observing his chic uncle, a French Voguedirector. Lemaire is a “mélomane” (music lover) with a DJ reputation and a compilation to his credit, but he gradually gave up his nighttime music for his daytime fashion life. Over the past 22 years, Lemaire has quietly been building his own men’s and women’s brand. Today, Christophe Lemaire is sold at its own store on Paris’ rue Poitou in the Marais, downstairs from the design studio. It’s also carried by independent shops all over the world, including Paris’s Bon Marché; New York’s Atelier, Bird, and Assembly; and online at thecorner.com. Lemaire’s look is natural and chic, which might sound banal if you don’t know what a rare commodity that is today. He believes clothes should look smart and be practical. He prefers shiny hair to hats; loves warm browns, including taupe, in tonal combinations; high-waist trousers for women; sweaters with side slits so you can put your hands in your pockets; and sweeping trench coats.We sat down with Christophe Lemaire in his studio last Saturday to talk about his style and to preview some of the winter pieces he will show tomorrow.Read more

Christophe Lemaire: Paris fashion’s ace of clubs

Rebecca Voight

Tomorrow morning in an old locksmith’s atelier in Paris’ once industrial 11th arrondissement, Christophe Lemaire will hold a show for his eponymous brand. It is his first in a long time. For the past two years, Lemaire has been the women’s designer for Hermès. Before that, he made the crocodile look chic in mens- and womenswear for Lacoste. 

Lemaire’s love affair with fashion began when he served as an intern for Yves Saint Laurent back in 1985. Or maybe it started earlier, inspired by his mother and grandmother who wore YSL or by observing his chic uncle, a French Voguedirector. Lemaire is a “mélomane” (music lover) with a DJ reputation and a compilation to his credit, but he gradually gave up his nighttime music for his daytime fashion life. Over the past 22 years, Lemaire has quietly been building his own men’s and women’s brand. Today, Christophe Lemaire is sold at its own store on Paris’ rue Poitou in the Marais, downstairs from the design studio. It’s also carried by independent shops all over the world, including Paris’s Bon Marché; New York’s Atelier, Bird, and Assembly; and online at thecorner.com. Lemaire’s look is natural and chic, which might sound banal if you don’t know what a rare commodity that is today. He believes clothes should look smart and be practical. He prefers shiny hair to hats; loves warm browns, including taupe, in tonal combinations; high-waist trousers for women; sweaters with side slits so you can put your hands in your pockets; and sweeping trench coats.

We sat down with Christophe Lemaire in his studio last Saturday to talk about his style and to preview some of the winter pieces he will show tomorrow.

Read more


photographed by Maya Nightingale for Peter Movrin

photographed by Maya Nightingale for Peter Movrin

(Source: opaqueglitter)